Feeling Impatient
Follow us on...
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook
Register

Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By bobofat
  • 1 Post By TomC
  • 1 Post By Mick2016

Feeling Impatient

This is a discussion on Feeling Impatient within the Introduction Area forums, part of the BCA Main Navigation category; I've always wanted to have an aquarium so I finally mustered enough courage and got a used set up on ...

  1. #1
    Forum Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    8

    LightbulbFeeling Impatient

    I've always wanted to have an aquarium so I finally mustered enough courage and got a used set up on Craigslist. A friend of mine is a fanatic when it comes to aquariums and has promised to help me get this project going. The only thing is, he's super busy until April and I'm getting impatient staring at an empty tank staring at me all day ;D. I also found out how much more money needs to be spent in setting everything else up. It looks like I'm skipping many lunches. I look forward to learning here and making a success story out of all this.

    Just in case you are curious here is what I have and what my friend thinks I should do:

    Fluval 206 filter with everything Sponge&bioballs
    3 Fluval heaters
    Aqauclear filter 70 with spnge&media
    Eheim 350surface skimmer
    Whisper air pump

    My friend advised me to:
    1) Get Aragonite substrate
    2) Look into Tanganyikan Fish (Especially shell dwellers)

    Any advice to this newb is greatly appreciated. Not really sure how forums work but I guess it emails me if anyone replies?
    Dou likes this.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BCAquaria.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Mr Know It all Reckon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Maple Ridge
    Posts
    2,780

    Default

    Welcome to BCA! I'm sure we can all relate with being patient to get an aquarium project going.
    Just wondering what size tank did you purchase?

    You won't get emails unless you subcribe to this tread (found under thread tools). But you will get emails if someone sends you a private message (you can message someone or check their profile by clicking on their name/handle).
    Last edited by Reckon; 1 Week Ago at 12:18 AM.
    3gal ADA Mini S low tech: Coral moss and Cherry Shrimp
    50gal high tech planted: Ember Tetras, Cardinal Tetras, Lemon Tetras, Crossocheilus sp., Silvertip Plecos


    Oooh I get it: Boy fish + Girl fish = Fry + MTS
    Plants are pretty + Various Species = Aquascaped MTS

  4. #3
    Forum Snooper
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Chilliwack
    Posts
    170

    Default

    Depending on your budget . . . freshwater setups generally cost less to set up and maintain. At least, the livestock can be found at lower prices. Even "cheap" marine fish can be pricey. Also, freshwater aquariums are less complicated for someone new to the hobby.

    Of course, these are only my observations; others may have other ideas to share.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    BCAquaria.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Forum Snooper Mark Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Qualicum Beach
    Posts
    230

    Default

    I am currently staring at a box of water that cost me close to 1000 dollars to get my hands on. Believe me when I say there is nothing on God's green earth I want to do more than see something in it. That being said, without the patience in the beginning of the hobby you will have a hard time with the patience the hobby demands. It does kind of drive one a little batty waiting but use that time to research what you want and get things going in your favor.

    A Tanganyikan Fish biotope probably isn's the easiest thing to get going for someone new to the hobby however, if you are willing to put the time in a fellow can do anything they want to. My advice would be to wait for your friend however if that will take too long, research that gear you bought, get that aragonite set it all up and fill it with water. Do some research on a fishless cycle for a fresh water tank. This is a simplified version http://www.drtimsaquatics.com/resour...shless-cycling. That probably isn't the best guide however it is a starting point to know what you are looking for, the more extensive guides and the form information available are much better however i do not want to throw a dictionary in your face this early in the game. Invest in a good test kit, for fresh water i recommend the API freshwater master test kit, it will run you around 40 dollars and last you longer than you need it. Slightly more expensive than a "strips" test kit initially however it will out last them and it is much more accurate. Get your hands on a good dechlorinator, I use API Super Strength Decholrinator but Seachem Prime is also a very popular choice, there are many on the market and they are mostly the same, again research. Take your time and go slow is the best advice anyone can give but with these simple steps and some help from all these friendly fellows by the time your friend is available to help you in April you will be well on your way to a healthy tank and he can give you some stocking advice and fill in the information you haven't been able to find on your own. Sometimes the hardest part isn't finding the information you want, it is knowing what questions to ask. Heaven knows i an not the smartest person in the room around here, but i am always available to help if you like!

    Best of luck
    Last edited by Mark Brown; 1 Week Ago at 04:56 AM.

  7. #5
    Forum Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thanks for all the advice guys! The tank that I have is a 46 Gallon tank 37inch long, 21inch tall, 12inch wide.

    I've been doing research online and maybe the Tanganyikan Project shouldn't be my first. I think I'm going to start with something much easier because the last thing I want to do is invest in rare livestock that may die due to my lack of experience.

    Anyway, thanks for welcoming me and I look forward to being a part of this community!

  8. #6
    Forum Addicted
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Cloverdale
    Posts
    1,859

    Default

    In my experience a Tanganyikan shell dweller tank is one of the easier set ups to manage. Once you get the water parameters correct and establish a routine, the fish do very well.

    Use the aragonite for a substrate. Buy a water test kit. Kh and gh are the important factors. Get baking soda, cooking salt (or kosher salt), and Epsom salt. I have a 40 gallon. To start I added 4 tablespoons each of the baking soda and cooking salt and 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt.
    This got the water to the correct kh and gh. (But check it with your kit.) I never check ph, and haven’t had an issue. Once a week I change 10 gallons of water. It helps to have a piece of tape on the tank which will tell you where water level minus 10 gallons is. Add 1 tablespoon each of soda & salt, and ½ tablespoon of Epsom. Occasionally use your water kit to keep things within a reasonable range. (Always at first.) That’s it.

    I find Tanganyikans to be very hardy and easy to keep. The shellies will definitely breed. If you go this route, get some Petricolas. They are my favourite.



    Reckon likes this.

  9. #7
    Forum Snooper
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Chilliwack
    Posts
    170

    Default

    I started a freshwater aquarium a year ago. Very basic. My only wish was to be able to keep live, not plastic or silk, plants. I have pet store sand on the bottom, a HOB filter, no heater, two air stones buried in the sand, and a thermometer suction cupped on the inside. No CO2 setup, but live plants are doing well with fertilizer tabs and fluorescent lighting for about 12 hours a day. A Google search will uncover several low-tech plant options which are fairly easy to find/buy. Water stays at room temperature of 24 degrees without the use of a tank heater.

    Stock: Neon Tetras, Glowlight Tetras, Oto Cats, Corys, Guppies and one Assassin Snail.

    Wednesday and Friday, I do a water change which takes 15-20 minutes each time. An hour on Sundays is set aside for water change, sand vacuuming, filter and cartridge rinses, and trimming of plants (as needed).

    A very sane schedule for the amount of enjoyment I get from it. Win-Win. Cost of monthly maintenance is well under $20 (after the initial costs of supplies and stock, which, of course, was several hundred dollars). The bi-monthly hydro bill increased by $5.

    So . . . while you are waiting to set up your tank, do lots of research. Read the labels on packages. If your questions about supplies or stock are not answered, don't buy until you find the answer from a source you trust. Doing the homework always pays off in the long run. :0)


    P.S. Some day I would like a larger tank, and will maintain a similar stock of fishes (only more of them) and plants. Therefore, the maintenance routine will vary little . . . just more water involved. (hehehe)
    Last edited by Mick2016; 1 Week Ago at 03:33 PM.
    bobofat likes this.

 

 


Similar Threads

  1. HELP ! - I'm feeling quite foolish!
    By discuspaul in forum Aqua Lounge
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 4 Weeks Ago, 11:01 AM
  2. Feeling a bit stupid!
    By Tazzy_toon in forum Freshwater Chat
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-10-2014, 12:17 PM
  3. water change regime: so many threads too impatient.
    By rickwaines in forum Canadian Aqua Farm Discus Hatchery
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-12-2013, 07:58 PM
  4. Getting impatient!
    By cichlidsguy23 in forum Breeding/Spawning Section
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 10-07-2012, 10:19 PM
  5. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 04-02-2011, 12:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Vancouver Website Hosting Chilliwack Website Design