British Columbia Aquariums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
They are midgefly larvae. And you can get some live ones outside in gardens with stagnant water that have some form of organic matter. Just that you wouldn't know if they were parasite or disease free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
They are not mayfly larvae (not that it really maters), but chironomid larvae, closely related to the mosquito, but the larvae look totally different that a mosquito larvae. When a chironomid hatches it, looks just like a mosquito, accept it cannot bite. Put a bucket in your backyard and put some leaves in it with some water and you will have blood-worms in no time at all (a month or 2). Keep it out of the direct light!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
They are not mayfly larvae (not that it really maters), but chironomid larvae, closely related to the mosquito, but the larvae look totally different that a mosquito larvae. When a chironomid hatches it, looks just like a mosquito, accept it cannot bite. Put a bucket in your backyard and put some leaves in it with some water and you will have blood-worms in no time at all (a month or 2). Keep it out of the direct light!
so its as simple as that? i wouldnt mind getting some bloodworms started if i can get some full details on what exactly has to be done and needed. and if i would have enough to feed or just small amounts.:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
It's really easy. Just get a container and fill it with some dried dead leaves. Fill it with water and let nature take care of the rest. I did however use some blanched lettuce to initially get the algae and infusoria rolling to attract the adults. Even if you don't do this, they'll lay eggs in any body of water.

You won't need to feed them much. They will use the decaying matter to build their tunnels. I did throw in some cucumber. Their primary diet is blue-green algae in the water column and the surfaces of the decaying leaves. If you can keep attracting adults to the site, you'll have a constant supply. The midge(chironomid) adults lay clumps of jelly full of black dots (eggs) kinda like snails, which then hatch baby blood worms. I harvest them when they get about just under and inch in length.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I beleive in about 3 weeks. It changes with temperature and food availability. It took mine about a month since it was still on the colder side for the last month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
you don't. I have been lucky and I have not noticed any mosquitos in the hatchery or in the area at the moment. Their larvae I believe float on the top of the water so I suppose you could just net them out. You can google mosquito larvae to identiy the visual of their larvae. Although one could put a lid on the container, you would also obstruct adult midges from laying new eggs in the container. I suppose nasties is a relative term. I mean, what does one consider nasty right? Damselfly larvae, mayfly larvae.... other tiny flies? I just try to perceive all organisms in my tub as what would naturally occur in an aquatic ecosystem and therefore I'm not concerned about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
Betta Guy please let us in on how you did it.
I would love to get a source of these.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
hehe I already stated it earlier. Just place a bucket with water and decaying leaves outside. Also throw in a piece of blanched lettuce/zuccini and you're set.

Betta Guy please let us in on how you did it.
I would love to get a source of these.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top