British Columbia Aquarium Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So what's the deal with Brine shrimp (and maybe some other frozen foods)?

I first heard I think J&L have problems with getting brine in, all I see in their fridge is PE Mysis. (Unless they have another freezer in the back)
This has been the case for a long time.

Today I went to IPU in Richmond and they're out of brine shrimp and are telling me that Asia imports are not clearing standards to be brought over here. They told me to buy up any brine I see because it may be in severely limited supply soon.
PE being the only brand in canada to make mysis makes it pricier they said...Also they have only limited brine shrimp production (I don't recall them makiing brine shrimp at all but this is what he said)

I called Ocean Aquatics who said they never heard of such a thing, (However they're out of pure brine shrimp at the moment have some mixed trays)

Went to King Ed Pets and they have LOTS (a few styrofoam packing containers) of brine shrimp both regular and spirulina.

So what's the deal???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
Better off and culture your own brine shrimps......get quality brine shrimps eggs....hatching rates over 90 %.....not that hard to do.

Hatching Brine Shrimp Cysts
Instructions and Guidelines

Below you will find the Web's most complete and simple-to-follow brine shrimp hatching instructions!
Storing Brine Shrimp Eggs

First of all, you need to start with healthy, properly stored eggs. All brine shrimp eggs need to be stored as follows:

* in a tightly sealed container;
* free from moisture; and
* in a cool environment at or below 50°F. (Refrigeration is ideal for short term storage, i.e., less than three to four weeks; for longer term storage, eggs are best kept at or below freezing.)

We recommend that upon receiving your eggs, dividing them into an amount that will be consumed within three to four weeks and storing this amount in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator; the remainder should be stored, also in a tightly sealed container, in the freezer. Keep in mind that freezing can lower metabolic activity and delay hatch-out. We suggest removing egg from the freezer one day in advance of using it.

The above storage guidelines apply to all brine shrimp eggs, whether in opened or unopened tins.
Hatching Environment

Follow these guidelines for the best results:

* Salinity:
25 parts per thousand (ppt) salt solution, or approximately 1 and 2/3 tablespoons of salt per quart (or liter) of water. This equates to around 1.018 specific gravity as measured with a hydrometer. Be sure to use marine salt or solar salt.

* pH:
Proper pH is important in hatching brine shrimp. A starting pH of 8.0 or higher is recommended. In areas where the water pH is below 7, Epson salt or magnesium sulfate can be added at the rate of 1/2 teaspoon per quart of solution to buffer the hatching solution.

* Temperature:
Optimum water temperature for a 24-hour complete hatch is 80-82°F or 26-28°C. Lowering the temperature would result in a longer hatching time. Do not exceed 30°C.

* Light:
Illumination is necessary to trigger the hatching mechanism within the embryo during the first few hours of incubation. Maintaining a light source during the entire incubation period is recommended to obtain optimum hatch results and for temperature control.

* Aeration:
Constant aeration is necessary to keep cysts in suspension and to provide sufficient oxygen levels for the cysts to hatch. A minimum of 3 parts per million dissolved oxygen during the incubation is recommended. Strong aeration should not damage or hurt the brine shrimp cysts or nauplii.

* Stocking Density:
1 gram per liter or quart or approximately 1/2 level teaspoon of cysts per quart is recommended. A higher stocking density will result in a lower hatch percentage.

* Hatching Cone:
Flat-bottom hatching vessels should be avoided. Cone or "V" bottomed containers are best to insure that the cysts remain in suspension during hatching. Be sure to thoroughly wash the hatching cone with a light chlorine solution, rinse, and allow to air-dry between uses. Avoid soap. Soap will leave a slight residue which will foam from aeration during hatching and leave cysts stranded above the water level.

* Incubation Period:
Generally, the optimum incubation time is 24 hours. Egg which has been properly stored for more than 2-3 months may require additional incubation time - up to 30-36 hours. Oftentimes, eggs will hatch in as few as 18 hours. If a smaller size nauplii (Instar I) is desired, a harvest time of 18 hours is recommended.

Helpful Hint:

Brine shrimp egg is sometimes very buoyant. In order to maximize the hatching percentage, it is sometimes helpful to swirl the water inside the hatching container with your finger once or twice at intervals in the first 4 to 6 hours of incubation in order to knock down eggs that have been stranded on the side of the container above the water-line. After about 6 hours, the eggs are usually well-hydrated and will stay in the water column.
Hatching Procedure

The following steps will achieve optimum brine shrimp hatch rates.

1. Set Up:
Place hatching cone or similarly shaped vessel in well-lit area. Cone should be semi-translucent for ease of harvesting and light transmission.

2. Add Water:
Fill cone with water and adjust salinity to 25 ppt (parts per thousand). Optimum hatching temperature is 82°F (28°C).

3. Add Cysts:
Add cysts at the rate of 1 gram per liter.

4. Aerate:
Provide adequate aeration to keep cysts in suspension.

5. Hatch:
Depending upon water temperature, cysts should hatch in approximately 18-36 hours.

6. Harvest:
After hatching brine shrimp, turn off or remove aeration and wait several minutes for the shells and and baby brine shrimp (or nauplii) to separate. Newly hatched nauplii will settle to the bottom of the cone or move towards a light source; the shells will float to the surface. Once separated, the nauplii can be siphoned from the bottom with a length of air tubing or gently drained through the bottom of the cone through a valve, if so equipped.

7. Rinse:
The warm incubation temperatures and metabolites from the hatching medium create ideal conditions for a bacteria bloom. Rinsing of the baby brine shrimp in a fine mesh net or sieve using clean fresh or salt water is important before feeding them to your fish.

8. Clean Equipment:
Tanks and brine shrimp hatching equipment should be cleaned and disinfected routinely.

I bought the eggs form them.

http://www.brineshrimpdirect.com/c1/Brine-Shrimp-Eggs-c2.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,998 Posts
those instructions are for bbs francis..thats not what they are looking for.
there was a problem with bringing in from china..till permits are done..it is on its way back. but some wholesalers still had and or had it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
lol my bad.....or read Andrew Soh's book the Naked Truth(page 69) how to grow them to adult size.

those instructions are for bbs francis..thats not what they are looking for.
there was a problem with bringing in from china..till permits are done..it is on its way back. but some wholesalers still had and or had it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,247 Posts
So what's the deal with Brine shrimp (and maybe some other frozen foods)?

I first heard I think J&L have problems with getting brine in, all I see in their fridge is PE Mysis. (Unless they have another freezer in the back)
This has been the case for a long time.

Today I went to IPU in Richmond and they're out of brine shrimp and are telling me that Asia imports are not clearing standards to be brought over here. They told me to buy up any brine I see because it may be in severely limited supply soon.
PE being the only brand in canada to make mysis makes it pricier they said...Also they have only limited brine shrimp production (I don't recall them makiing brine shrimp at all but this is what he said)

I called Ocean Aquatics who said they never heard of such a thing, (However they're out of pure brine shrimp at the moment have some mixed trays)

Went to King Ed Pets and they have LOTS (a few styrofoam packing containers) of brine shrimp both regular and spirulina.

So what's the deal???
The deal is that many companies (from outside of Canada) are not certified yet through the CFIA to bring them in across the border. I think the first major company is Hikari that the CFIA has stopped as the CFIA requires that all food producers have to comply with their standards/inspections. The only exception is for their bloodworms as they have tested/complied with CFIA for that. This is also true for all other food companies so the supply has been dwindling. I'm not 100% sure on this but this what what I've been told. The PE mysis is in large supply as they are located in BC and are Canadian.

King Ed's will often buy foods in very large amounts so they will likely have stock for a while. I hope that helps.
_
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
but what about the future?
any word weather companies will clear the certifications and resume imports?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,998 Posts
hikari is on its way in. about 4 more weeks..a huge container load coming in straight from japan to a wholesaler im dealing with. the bloodworms etc havent stopped..ive been getting them all along. they have them. but when everyeone heard there was going to be a shortage..alot of people and stores bought large amounts..and depleted the demand at the wholesalers.
i have lots of hikari and the other wholesaler still has some stock. limited now though.
another one that was affected was ocean nutrition flake. it has bovine in it and from china. so its out for now.
still some at some of the stores and wholesalers left.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top