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This is my first post since the disaster!

I've kept and bred all kinds of fish for over 35 years. I was given my first tank at about the age of 10 and have never looked back.

My last trip to the Vancouver Aquarium hit a spot when looking at the display info about the plight of the Victorian cichlid population. I knew about it but didn't realize the extent of it.

I currently have only 1 tank running with a breeding pair of Chocolate Cichlids, a red spotted severum, an EBJD, a breeding pair of regular BN plecos and 6 Irian red rainbows. I do however have several tanks at my disposal (In the crawlspace).

I want to get into breeding either endagered freshwater fish or possibly saltwater fish/invertebrates/seahorses to help in the captive bred programs. I have experience in both.

I guess it is my old age and my wanting to give back to the aquarium and aquatic community. I always wanted to be a marine biologist from a young age and I currently build my own setups (lighting, filtration etc.).

What do you think would be best in this community to help.

Your opinions would be appreciated.
 

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I would say pick the ones that appeal to you more. If you pick based on what other people think and not what you want to do I think you will have a harder time doing it.

Good luck with your breeding program, I think its a great idea.
 

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welcome to BCA

There are a lot of fresh water fish that you can help and breed so ppl do not have to get WC one. Check to see what you like, I might be able to help you to locate some.
 

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You can look as near as your local freshwater stream for endangered species. There is some place in the states called the Ark with about 600 aquariums each housing the last of their kind.
 

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Good for you. I think this is something that we hobbyists should all pay attention to. I think we all have a responsibility to gather information about sustainability before we buy anything wild caught. I'm sure that in many cases sustainability is not an issue, but clearly in some cases it is.
 

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Keeping a viable population of any species going long term is generally beyond the means of hobbyists. There is too much genetic drift. The end result is a fish that could not survive in the wild.

The best contribution we can make is to not buy fish that we know are wild caught in a manner that is unstainable, or damages the environment. Knowing which fish these are isnt always easy, so I err on the side of caution.

Really the most important thing is to support organizations or governments that do something to protect the habitat.
 

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Some killifish are endangered in the wild and quite easy to raise in a tank. Have you thought of killifish? There's apparently a Killifish Society in Vancouver.
 

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A noble cause, the CITES list would be a good place to start cross referencing with aquarium trade lists to come up with some ideas. Then there would have to a be a reasonable amount of market demand and an easy way for you to get them to market.
 

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You can look as near as your local freshwater stream for endangered species. There is some place in the states called the Ark with about 600 aquariums each housing the last of their kind.
I have heard of this place before! I believe they house amphibians mostly. I would love a tour of this place, but I think I remember it is under strict lock down because they are afraid of introducing diseases that may kill the remaining specimens. Amazing work though.
 
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