British Columbia Aquarium Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These guys are probably my favourite fish at the moment. I have a group of 6 in a 75G. Their colour pattern is fantastic and they are always out in the open, playing and/or courting. They lay eggs regularly but the eggs are hard to find because the females hide them instead of laying them on the glass like other species of corys. And then they get eaten by my apistos if I don't rescue them immediately. I have managed to save 3 so far, and the fry are doing well and growing in a separate tank. Anyway, here's a pic. Only one specimen because they move constantly and I'm not good with a camera.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: The Guy

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
you are pretty good with a camera, seems better than me! I like these corys a lot, will have to find some. Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. They are hard to find locally. There's a similar species that is sometimes available locally. They're called Corydoras Adolfoi. I think April has some, or had some recently. They are nice too. They also have the orange hue right behind the head, but the black bands are not as wide or as deep in colour compared to the Duplicareus. That can be hard to tell when the fish are young of course, so they can also be mislabeled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
I have about 8 of these I bought from “hp10BII” they are great fish. They are about 2 years old now. Maybe I should try my hand at spawning them. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My favourite corydoras species. I have the success breeding them in their own spawning tank. Where did you get your duplicareus?
Great to hear about local breeding success with these guys. So did you not have to remove the eggs then, or the parents after spawning? In other words did the parents not eat the eggs? I got mine from Aquariums West a couple of years ago. They were pricey but I certainly don't regret the expense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have about 8 of these I bought from "hp10BII" they are great fish. They are about 2 years old now. Maybe I should try my hand at spawning them. Any suggestions?
I am not doing anything special to condition them. Just a planted tank with places to hide, good food and water quality, and some tanins through the like of almond leaves. I do try to lower the water temp by a couple of degrees when I do water changes, but then I haven't really noticed a correlation between water changes and spawning activity. So who knows. Maybe hp10BII has special tricks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
I've accumulated my colony probably over a period of 8-10 years. Usually during our wet season when our heavy rains are here, they start doing their cory dance and if I have the time to breed and raise fry, I'll get things set up. When my duplicareus colony is low, I make more. ;)

I try to match a female to 2 or 3 males, so 2 trios/groups in a breeding tank. I use a 15 gallon, water filled to about the 10 gallon mark. Condition them with good food, frozen blood worms, FD Black worms, brine shrimp flakes, a good quality pellet food and within a month the females should be ready to throw eggs. Almond leaves are good, the spawning tank will have a thin layer of pool filter sand. some driftwood. When there is a storm coming, the corys will let you know and I do a big water change with cold water, even as much as 5*C cooler. They'll throw eggs all over the glass, heaters seem to be a favourite, I don't use a spawning mop.

I do collect the eggs and raise them out in a 10g tank and transfer them to larger tanks when the juveniles are sizing up. So nothing special, this is probably what other cory breeders do with their groups.

They are normally housed in a community tank, I do see eggs, but they'll be picked off by the apistos and tetras too. If you want to produce more fry, I would set up a breeding tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
The parents don't really show too much interest in eating their eggs, not like bronze or other corys. But I do collect them when I see them. Shortly after laying, the eggs are softer and stickier so they're easier to collect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes the eggs are remarkably sticky. And big compared to bronze cory eggs. The other day my son spotted an egg but immediately an apisto picked it up. But the apisto had the hardest time eating it. Perhaps it was the size because the apisto is still young and not adult size, but more likely it was the stickyness. The egg just stay there stuck to the apisto's mouth for minutes and minutes. :bigsmile:
 
  • Like
Reactions: The Guy and hp10BII

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
Very cool. I have a few now and more coming this week I believe. My supplier calls the adolphois but I’d say more likely duplicarus.
One of my favs also


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have several long and wide Rubbermaid stock tanks - I'd love to see a hundred of them shoaling one day... :)
I know, it would be an awesome sight. I have just set up a 33 Long to grow out some (other species) fry. But eventually it would be great to use as a species tank for the Duplicareus. Maybe not a hundred of them, because at the current pace of harvesting the older ones will be dead before I can harvest that many! :bigsmile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Very cool. I have a few now and more coming this week I believe. My supplier calls the adolphois but I'd say more likely duplicarus.
One of my favs also

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Good to know April. Out of curiosity, how much do you sell yours, whatever they are?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
I know, it would be an awesome sight. I have just set up a 33 Long to grow out some (other species) fry. But eventually it would be great to use as a species tank for the Duplicareus. Maybe not a hundred of them, because at the current pace of harvesting the older ones will be dead before I can harvest that many! :bigsmile:
You can do it. If you're already collected some eggs in a community tank, it may just take several months of hard work in their own breeding tank. I think I grew out over 100 a couple of years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You can do it. If you're already collected some eggs in a community tank, it may just take several months of hard work in their own breeding tank. I think I grew out over 100 a couple of years ago.
Maybe I am paranoid, but I have become wary over the years about moving fish to a different tank for breeding purposes. It has happened to me more than once to lose a fish or two because of it (stress, or whatever the reason was). And then feel crappy about myself for disrupting them. These guys seem so happy in their current tank that I'll leave them alone for now. I think I'll try to give them a spawning mop and see if they use it. And take it from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
I know what you mean, I've had unfortunate incidences when just doing basic maintenance moving hardscape and trimming plants that corys freak and dash around the tank and the next thing you know, they're floating on the surface of the water...and not in a good way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,215 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
(Crappy) pic of one of the babies in 10G grow-out tank.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top