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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was considering starting a patio pond and was wondering if a Dojo Loach will survive the winters here?
 

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darb, cool idea man. if my dog didnt S**T on the deck maybe id giver a crack at that project.
 

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It should eb no problem...dojo loaches are extremely hardy
 

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I was considering starting a patio pond and was wondering if a Dojo Loach will survive the winters here?
weather loach will survive in the pond over winter. I have 8 weather loach outside my pond for over 2 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, mine would be above ground, so slightly colder, but probably still safe.
 

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thanks, mine would be above ground, so slightly colder, but probably still safe.
oooo... then that i wouldnt count on.... my pond is 5 feet deep
 

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wow really?! How big are they now? I have 2 in my 50G and they are approx. 10" -12" long, so big! Post some photos of your pond and weather loaches?
if anyones has seen my pond its not possible lol, i turned off waterfall and UV so my pond is crazy green + good luck catching them loaches =)
 

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From what I understand they are pretty low maintenance. Guess I'm going to find out, a friend is giving me 3-6" critters. Going away for a few months so shutting down his tanks. have to set something up for them. If worse comes to worse I'll just sneak them into the koi pond next door :D
 

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From what I understand they are pretty low maintenance. Guess I'm going to find out, a friend is giving me 3-6" critters. Going away for a few months so shutting down his tanks. have to set something up for them. If worse comes to worse I'll just sneak them into the koi pond next door :D
one thing to note, careful loaches arent eaten by the kois
weather loaches bodies are full of ammonia and high chance that anything that eats it will die from the high levels of ammonia
 

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I had no idea weather loaches could handle low temps lke our winter. Does anyone know of any other "tropical" type fish that can handle our winter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I had no idea weather loaches could handle low temps lke our winter. Does anyone know of any other "tropical" type fish that can handle our winter?
the Dojo Loach is actually a cold water fish that is kept in tropical aquariums.

this is a start, our climate is still probably too cold for most though, if I had to bet on one, I would put my money on the white clouds:
http://freshaquarium.about.com/od/fishqa/f/coldwaterfish.htm

Barbs - Several readily available species of Barbs are tolerant of temperatures into the mid sixties, or even lower. All are easy to care for, and are suitable for a community aquarium. They include: the Gold Barb (Barbus schuberti), the Green Barb (Barbus schuberti), the Rosy Barb (Barbus conchonius), and the Two Spot Barb (Barbus ticto).

Bloodfin Tetra - Both the standard Bloodfin (Aphyocharax anisitsi), and the False Bloodfin (Aphyocharax dentatus) tolerate temperatures as low as the mid sixties. Bloodfins are offered in many pet shops, are easy to care for, and are quite hardy. They are active top dwellers and are best kept in schools.

Buenos Aires Tetra (Hemigrammus caudovittatus) - Easily found for sale, they will tolerate temperatures into the mid sixties. Standard varieties, as well as albino variants can be found. Like the Bloodfins, they are undemanding and easy to care for. They are suitable for a community tank, but will eat live plants voraciously.

Croaking Tetra (Coelurichthys microlepis) - Not often found for sale, they are an attractive fish that is worth shopping around for. Like other coldwater tetras, they are easy to care for and are suitable for community tanks.

Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) - As readily available as any fish, there are many attractive variations of this popular fish.

Hillstream Loaches - Although they are not often seen in pet shops, some species can be found for sale from time to time. Not all of them prefer cool temperatures, but most will tolerate temps that fall into the mid to upper sixties.

Native Fish - A variety of North American native fish are now being sold in the aquarium trade. Virtually all of them tolerate cool water. Availability varies from state to state, as do laws regarding which species may be legally kept in home aquariums. Keep in mind that some will become too large to keep in a standard aquarium.

Pearl Danio (Brachydanio albolineatus) - Like the zebra danio, this fish is very hardy and easy to care for. It will tolerate temperatures into the mid 60's without difficulty, and is easy to find. They are larger than zebras, but need not be kept in schools.

Weather Loach (Misgurnus angullicaudatus) - Readily available, this loach is one of the easiest to care for. Couple that with the fact that it will tolerate temperatures into the fifties, and it makes an excellent candidate for a coldwater tank.

Wimple (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) - Also known as the Freshwater Batfish. Not commonly found, it is an unusual fish that is worth tracking down if you like to have something unique. It will tolerate temps into the mid sixties.

White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichtys albonubes) - One of the easiest fish to care for, a new gold colored variant has become very popular. They do best in cooler temperatures, although very low temps will lessen their attractive coloration.

Zebra Danio (Brachydanio rerio) - Outside of goldfish and the guppy, the zebra is the most readily available of all coldwater fish. They tolerate temps that fall into the mid sixties, and are very easy to care for. Long finned species are available, as well as a popular leopard spotted variety.
 

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If buiding your pond yourself insulate with rigid styrofoam inslation between liner and outer shell. In winters we don't have Olympics we get frost, so a pond deicer or aquarium heater would prevent your patio pond from freezing solid.
 
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