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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could anyone tell me what kind of snail i have here


The guy at my local pet store gave them to me because
he wanted to know what they r. they r running wild in his
store but never get a chance to mature, because the fish
always eat them. so he gave me4 and i put them into a
spare tank i have. and would like to see them mature even
reproduce(my comets like small snails)
 

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It is a common pond snail (lymnaea species). They can become a nuisance, BUT will not eat plants ;).

Best Regards,

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everybody i did some research and i believe that it is a Physidae from the family of pulmonate freshwater snails because of the way the shell spirals,the sinistral ("left-handed") direction of the spiral -- when viewed from the opening, the shell spirals to the left.
 

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Pond, though I have heard them go by the name "bladder snails"... I have a few in my snail farm and they move FAST! Though they haven't laid eggs yet :(
 

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Pond, though I have heard them go by the name "bladder snails"... I have a few in my snail farm and they move FAST! Though they haven't laid eggs yet :(
Don't fret, before you know it, you'll have 100's.... lol

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't fret, before you know it, you'll have 100's.... lol

Stuart
ive hade mine only 24 hours and i just watch one lay 5 eggs
 

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Geez, I've had my apple snails for nearly a month now and I'm still trying to keep an eye out for any eggs lol

But yeah, I'll have to agree on the pond snail bit. Based on what pictures I've seen, it looks very much the same.
 

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one of the most obvious way to tell physa from radix species is the antennas. The 'pond snail' group has short, triangular antennae; physa have longish, thread-like antennae.
 
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