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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I bought a figure eight puffer today from king eds, and it promptly died upon being placed in my tank. So me being me I tested all my parameters, which were perfect. So now Im looking for another figure eight puffer and if possible an Amazon puffer. Pm me if you can help me out. Thnx
 

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I would recommend checking out IPU. That's where I picked up my F8 and he is doing very well in freshwater. The F8s have beautiful markings and IPU has a livestock guarantee.

You will also want to make sure you slowly acclimate them. I pokde a hole in a bag full of tank water and let it drip into the bag from the store.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanx ngo911
 

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Discussion Starter #4
still looking for now
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bump..........
 

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Figure 8's do not belong in freshwater at all, sure they may live but only for a couple of years. When kept in proper brackish water they can live up too 18 years. In fresh water their slime coats get eaten away. If you don't plan on keeping an F8 in brackish water then you should not get them, cruel to the fish to keep them in freshwater. The fact that your tank is not freshwater may be the reason why the first one died. Not sure if IPU is keeping them in brackish, would be surprised if they are as most stores don't.
 

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I asked one of the ipu guys if they were freshwater or brackish and he said freshwater so I assume they are keeping them in freshwater. I though I had read somewhere that some f8s are naturally found in freshwater.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i read too in the freshwater atlas that they SHOULD be kept in freshwater as thats where they are naturally found
 

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The Puffer Forum • The Puffer Library » The Figure Eight Puffer; Colorful, Comical, Compact Fish

Although they are mostly found in freshwater in the wild, years of keeping this fish in captivity have shown that they are best kept in low-end brackish conditions. This equates to a specific gravity (S.G.) of around 1.005-1.008. If kept in freshwater, their immune system is apparently compromised, resulting in disease and early death for a fish that can live into its late teens. The longest-lived documented Figure 8 puffer was over 18 years old! Naturally, it was kept in brackish water.
Fig8PufSys
Those Tetraodon corr.s
Hi Bob, I thought there might be a conflict w/that one. I have a friend Robert T. Ricketts (perhaps you know him?) who has been keeping puffers for over 40 years. Almost everything I know about puffers I owe to him. Here is his article about F8s: FIGURE 8
Comments by RTR on the subject:
Fishbase always cites their references. For the F8 and the GSP, the ecological info is from Rainboth, W.J. 1996. But I have not looked up the original citation. Fishbase is a compilation of data from any or all that site being the population center for that particular fish, or a stray from other habitats, or a fringe population with marginal survival prospects. The distribution and ecology of these fish has not been studied widely as they have no economic importance. Reports include them mostly as found here and there, but they are rarely key species in studies.
Those indigenous groups using tropical fish collection as an income supplement are not literate populations. Collections tend to be seasonal (water and weather conditions permitting) and time-available from other activities. The collected specimens are pooled and later transported to a "wholesaler" or agent who arranges transport and handling to a population center or abroad. The paper trail, if any, is not detailed or particularly accurate. By the time the creature passes through an importer in the States or elsewhere, the a regional wholesale distributor, then the LFS, it is highly unlikely to have traceability back to even the country of origin, much less finer-grained data.
Without some non-trivial economic importance, fieldwork is too expensive to be supported. What little information we have that is really useful tends to come from talented individuals, such as Dr. Ebert on puffers, who happens to have a personal affinity for a group or family of fish, and has made enough side notes and generated enough personal experience to compile some publication for hobbyists after years of field work on other topics.
Several individuals have done similar works on Rift Lake fish, Rainbowfish, etc. Those reports are our only real and valuable ecological source data."
Robert
And again on the same subject:
My personal experience with these fish is that they do best in light brackish water (~1.005) over aragonite substrates (to support the high pH), with no exposure to unoxidized metabolites, and minimal exposure to nitrate (<20ppm). Under such conditions I expect them to live 15-20 years. In FW conditions I have never had one survive more than a few years, and they have been subject to chronic or repeated cornea and skin problems. YMMV, but I would never put one of these fish under my care into FW.
When Dr. Ebert's book came out, one of the things that delighted me most about it was that this fish, along with the GSP, were both noted as doing far better in brackish conditions. Both of those observations matched my own.
I have no way of knowing whether or not the fish we see in the trade are collected from the inland areas reported on fishbase, or from coastal, estuarine, or mangrove areas and potentially represent different populations. My personal experience does not at all agree with the fishbase report. But then they list the fish as being an algae and plant eater as well (from stomach contents). Obviously they have missed the experience of seeing these fish feed in captivity - algae or plant material is ingested routinely, along with the mollusk or small crustacean feeding on it. So there they are not incorrect as much as they misunderstand and misinterpret, or simply have never observed either in the wild or captivity, the dynamics of feeding for the fish."
Robert
I completely agree w/RTR. I have read over & over, circumstances where a person's F8 was failing, only to be put into BW & start to thrive.
I also wanted to remind you that the green spotted puffer (t nigroviridis) is a high-end BW puffer that prefers SW as an adult. There is also a t nigroviridis shown in the disease portion said to be a FW fluviatilis.
It might also be a good idea to mention in that section, the high probability of puffers coming in w/internal parasites. I Usually wind up treating most of them w/Discomed.
Jeni
Article by RTR
Figure Eight Puffers - A Great Small Brackish Fish

Figure 8 puffers fresh or brackish? - Aquaria Central

If RTR has studied and tested puffers for many many years I would like to think that what he says is pretty spot on. If you haven't heard of him google the name, they guy knows his stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Bump.........still looking for at least the amazon puffer
 

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SAPs also do best in groups of three or more BTW. Canadian Aquatics, IPU and King Eds had a batch a month or two or three ago now. Many puffers are seasonal and you may be in for a bit of a wait. But you may come across someone looking to rehome theirs on here.

They don't really adapt well to captivity and spend pretty much their entire existence in captivity pacing the glass. Sadly I regret purchasing mine, it breaks my heart to watch them pace ....
 

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definitely on anything with long fins and slow moving, probably on most others also ... I have read that scales and fins are a normal part of their natural diet. I took two off of a member that had three of the juvies maul a betta to death ....

mine went after my cories at first until the cories fought back as a group :)

then there is the issue of trimming their teeth every few months also.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
bump, please keep chat to a minimum
 
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