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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I am just thinking of starting a cichlid tank (already have discus and hoping to branch out:bigsmile:)
I came across the OB Peacock and have met some interestingly heated debates:confused: ... are they as bad as people make out? Is the fish healthy? How much of a stigma is really attached...

I was hoping to do Tropheus Ikola/Kasanga and possibly Aulonocara Maylandi/Jacobfriebergi/stuartgranti
 

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I have one in my Mbuna tank...minds his own business, not aggressive as far as Africans go, but also helps that it is one of the bigger fish in the tank.
 

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Some people love OBs and some dont. If you watch youtube videos of cichlids in lake malawi, you will see that there are OBs even in the wild.

They are usually more aggressive than other peacocks but not that they can't be successfully kept with other males (I have 2 in my male tank). Don't know if a tropheus and peacock tank will work as trophs are even more active/aggressive than peacocks...
 

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I've never kept Tropheus sp. before, but I believe they prefer to be kept in large groups to spread out aggression. A friend of mine who used to keep trophs had them in groups of 10 or more. Aulonocara maylandi are one of the most peaceful and shy peacocks out there, I doubt they will feel comfortable enough to colour up in a tank with more active/aggressive tank mates. Aulonocara stuartgranti are also quite mild in terms of their temperament, so out of the three Aulonocara you mentioned, Aulonocara jacobfreibergi would be my first choice.

As for the OB peacocks, some have been perfect for my all-male tank, while others have been downright nasty chasing anything that moves. However, they seem to tolerate aggression better than their purebred Aulonocara counterparts, so they may be worth a look in your tropheus setup. As always, larger tanks are more forgiving with African cichlids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone , I'm debating between a tall 90gallon corner tank or I have a long 134gallon tank
 

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Since the genus groups you are considering are both more open water than rock dwellers strictly rock dwellers, I'd opt for the tank with the most open space - usually the longest one.
 

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I agree. Long is better imo. And break up the sight lines, that way they can get away from each other if they are being harrassed a bit. A 6' tank is perfect for africans, not to say u can't have success in a 4' tank. The downside, takes a whole lot more fish to fill a 6 footer....
 

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More fish could be a good thing too!

One rule I like to follow with all my set-ups from my photo work is the 1/3 rule. If you are not familiar with this visual rule there are a bunch of info on it on the internet.

This will make it interesting for human viewing while breaking up the sight lines / swimming lanes for the fish. I also include water movers in the mix, helps the open water species feel they are swimming against a current.
 
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