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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, guys, I have an in-ground pool at home which was built by some in-ground pool builders from toronto ( Swimming Pool Builders Contractors Toronto | Solda Pools ). I never use the pool much and I am thinking of converting it into a pond. I have already bought some fishes like comet, koi carps and rossette's. I am thinking of buying more once the pond is settled and ready to go. I have heard that you need to get a good filter system. I have already got it so I can check that out of my list. Is there anything else that I need to look at? Any tips on this would be great.
 

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Disclaimer: I have never done or inquired about such a project.

At the risk of stating the obvious, this is a huge undertaking ($$$$) - and a bigger expense the bigger the pool is. It is rare that reno projects do not go over the quoted price (although perhaps some companies can stay on budget).

As a complete DIY job, beyond my expertise. I would contract out the stuff I could not do.

If your pool has recently been in use and has the fence in place, then this is likely not an issue. Its size, however, may still be a factor - especially if you wish to remove the fence. Additionally, it no longer will function as a (human) swimming pool, but will be used to house "livestock." It no longer will contain "swimming pool" water, but "fish" water. This may or may not make a difference from an environmental perspective. If you are running anything electrical to the pool area, this may need to be approved for use. Check with the authorities. Buddy next door may have a DIY pond, but he may not have realized he needed a permit (or chose to ignore the rules). On the other hand, a reputable company doing the work will see that the proper paperwork is in place before going ahead.

I would need to do plenty of homework on that one - equipment AND labour guarantees/warranties, follow-up care, reputation - before committing to a contract with any particular company. Apart from the direct "aquarium" equipment involved, I would imagine there to be considerable work needed in terms of landscaping, etc. so that it looks like a pond and not simply a swimming pool with fishes. Depending on where you live, you may require a permit to own and operate a pond in a residential area. Certain rules, restrictions and obligations may apply. One, generally, cannot have an open body of water on their property without some safety features in place.

Example: I once lived on a two-acre property that had an in-ground pool which had been filled in with soil by a previous owner (to use as a garden). I inquired about removing the dirt and re-establishing a functioning swimming pool. For community safety reasons, an 8-foot fence would have to be constructed to enclose the pool completely, with a gate that locks.

Lastly, consult your home insurance company regarding liability. What if the neighbour's cat goes fishing for lunch, falls in, and drowns? Sounds bizarre, but as a chlorinated swimming pool, animals are less likely to visit. With tempting "livestock" available, it could be a different matter to the insurance company.

Best of luck. Would be great to see some "before and after photos" if you decide to go ahead.
 

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Other than the liability factors, which are there whether it is a fish pond or a swimming pool, there really is nothing preventing the change .. A fish pond really doesn't need any fancy filtering. In fact.. Your swimming pool filtration system would be way overkill for a fish pond. The only real expenses you would have would be in the aquascaping. As far as filtration is concerned, you could create a "Marsh" area in the shallow end and plant emergent water plants there, with a small waterfall setup. Your filter pump could operate through a large UV light system to help control algae and discharge to the waterfall. Once higher plants are established in the pool and marsh, algae blooms should not be a problem. Even with no filtration at all, the pond would thrive.
 

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I would say if your going to do it I would find a way to heat it and go tropical
 

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usually swimming pools are more expensive then ponds but it all depends on the size. if it's small and you don't swim much then ya it would be great for a pond but if it's big then I would keep it just cause of resale value of the house. and turning it into a pond is pretty simple but making a pond look nice could get very expensive. koi fish are not very cheap and all the landscape around a pond can get very costly. also what's a pond without a waterfall. gotta have a waterfall.
 
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